Camera Panning – Back to Basics 34

Today were going to talk about camera panning. When you pan with a  camera that basically means that you’re moving the camera back and forth or left and right.

A similar camera movement is called tilt, which is the process of moving the camera up and down usually on a tripod.

Panning over on a shot is a common tactic that used in just about every TV show or movie that’s being produced today. So I my doing a back to basics article on camcorder panning?

The reason why I wanted to focus on this today, is because there are several things that you can do to screw up a shot.

The biggest thing to be aware of as you’re filming a particular video clip, is that when you pan to the left or to the right, you want to do this process very slowly.

If you move the camera too fast, your image will begin to look choppy, blurry, and out of focus.

This is particularly true if you’re shooting video at 24 frames per second, the traditional frame rate when making a movie using film.

Another common trouble some area when panning over to fast is a rolling shutter. A rolling shutter is the common type of problem, where the image that you shooting seems to shift left and right so the result looks like a polygon, and not a square image.

Below is a sample video that illustrates what rolling shutter looks like.

As you can see, by moving the camera too fast left or right image becomes blurry, and has earned unprofessional looking shift in the top part of the video.

The second tip I have for you and panning, is to use progressive versus interlaced frames. Progressive filming involves shooting all the lines of resolution with each individual frame, whereas interlaced frames will shoot all of the odd lines of a frame first, then the second frame will shoot all of the even lines of a particular frame.

The result is a video that has half of a progressive frame’s, frame rate.  In other words, 60 interlaced frames per second is the same as 30 progressive frames per second.

By having a reduced frame rates, panning once again becomes very obvious and goes auto-focus very quickly.

The last tip that I have for you running panning over is to use intentional focus change. Oftentimes you can see a shot in the beginning of the movie where one object that’s very close to the camera is in focus work and you can see another object in the background is out of focus.

As the camera pans slightly to the right the focus changes focusing on the back on object, and the foreground object becomes blurry.

This type of effect is common during opening credits of movies and TV shows. It gives the film an opening professional feel and shows the audience that the director and the filmmaker in the camera operator know what they’re doing.

For more back to basics lesson’s click on training on the top menu. If you have any questions or further thoughts feel free to post them below or use the contact form. I look forward to hearing from you.

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My name is Chris and I am the owner and operator of CamcorderChris.com. For over 10 years I have worked with computers, servers, video camcorders, software editing tools, and many other areas of information technology.

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Author: Chris

My name is Chris and I am the owner and operator of CamcorderChris.com. For over 10 years I have worked with computers, servers, video camcorders, software editing tools, and many other areas of information technology.

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